Discussion:
Sam Sloan leads in World Championship of Chinese Chess
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samsloan
2011-11-21 08:50:53 UTC
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By winning his first two games, Sam Sloan is now in first place in the
World Championship of Chinese Chess, now being played at Hotel
Borobudur in Jakarta, Indonesia.

In the first round, Sloan defeated Dmitry RUMYANTSEV of Russia.

In the second round Sloan defeated Chein Kyi of Myanmar (Borma)

A total of 78 invited players from 24 countries are contesting the
World Championship.

http://www.xiangqibowl.net/wxc/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=68&Itemid=78
None
2011-11-21 16:27:41 UTC
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Post by samsloan
By winning his first two games, Sam Sloan is now in first place in the
World Championship of Chinese Chess, now being played at Hotel
Borobudur in Jakarta, Indonesia.
In the first round, Sloan defeated Dmitry RUMYANTSEV of Russia.
In the second round Sloan defeated Chein Kyi of Myanmar (Borma)
A total of 78 invited players from 24 countries are contesting the
World Championship.
http://www.xiangqibowl.net/wxc/index.php?option=com_content&view=arti...
Sam, our chumpion.
micky
2011-11-22 00:10:53 UTC
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samsloan wrote:
.
Post by samsloan
In the second round Sloan defeated Chein Kyi of Myanmar (Borma)
Yai Wei, utterly fantastic....

BURMA - I think, yeah Burma..

Where the cute cats come from - no ?

http://www.mgtrust.org/burma.htm

.
samsloan
2011-11-22 00:36:50 UTC
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Post by micky
.
Post by samsloan
In the second round Sloan defeated Chein Kyi of Myanmar (Borma)
Yai Wei, utterly fantastic....
BURMA - I think, yeah Burma..
Where the cute cats come from - no ?
http://www.mgtrust.org/burma.htm
.
Right. Burma not Borma.

Sorry for the error.
None
2011-11-22 02:34:32 UTC
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Post by samsloan
Right. Burma not Borma.
Sorry for the error.
Shave and a haircut, two bits
samsloan
2011-11-26 05:22:16 UTC
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The Chinese Chess World Championship is a tough event, I played in the
2005 and 2007 editions. Congrats on winning the first two games, Sam,
but they were not against Chinese players (both were entered in the
non-Chinese section and finished 45th and 64th respectively out of 68).
You then lost the next 6 rounds and finally picked up a 3rd point in the
last round.
Its good to promote the event and Chinese Chess, and while 3 points is a
decent result, this post must be partially self-serving :o)
Congratulations to Jiang Chuan for winning the World Championship and to
Kon Island for (once again) winning the non-Chinese title. Full results
http://tinyurl.com/bvm9mwh
There are some games to play through, but no PGN download as far as I
can see.
Alain
--
abdekker
The truth came out in subsequent rounds. My second round opponent was
Chinese from Burma, but he was one of the weakest players in the event
and had won his first round game by having an even weaker opponent.

So, I took an early lead in the tournament by being the beneficiary of
the lottery pairing system. Pairing numbers were drawn by lot and it
just happened that the number I got gave me opponents I could beat in
the next two rounds.

My final score 3-6 was exactly the same score I got when I last played
in this event in 1995. This tends to indicate that I am about the same
strength as I was then which is no surprise as I have played almost
none at all in the intervening 16 years.

The real issue is that they allowed a Chinese person to win the World
Championship for non-Chinese. The $4500 first prize was won by a
player who was born in China, lives in Hong Kong, speaks Cantonese,
has a Chinese mother but a Dutch father so he is considered non-
Chinese. He also won the World Championship for non-Chinese in 2009.
He has won several other "non-Chinese" prizes as well. Allowing such a
person to continue to win these "non-Chinese" championships will
discourage those of us who really are not Chinese from competing.

Sam Sloan
Jürgen R.
2011-11-26 08:09:36 UTC
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Post by samsloan
The Chinese Chess World Championship is a tough event, I played in the
2005 and 2007 editions. Congrats on winning the first two games, Sam,
but they were not against Chinese players (both were entered in the
non-Chinese section and finished 45th and 64th respectively out of 68).
You then lost the next 6 rounds and finally picked up a 3rd point in the
last round.
Its good to promote the event and Chinese Chess, and while 3 points is a
decent result, this post must be partially self-serving :o)
Congratulations to Jiang Chuan for winning the World Championship and to
Kon Island for (once again) winning the non-Chinese title. Full results
http://tinyurl.com/bvm9mwh
There are some games to play through, but no PGN download as far as I
can see.
Alain
--
abdekker
The truth came out in subsequent rounds. My second round opponent was
Chinese from Burma, but he was one of the weakest players in the event
and had won his first round game by having an even weaker opponent.
So, I took an early lead in the tournament by being the beneficiary of
the lottery pairing system. Pairing numbers were drawn by lot and it
just happened that the number I got gave me opponents I could beat in
the next two rounds.
My final score 3-6 was exactly the same score I got when I last played
in this event in 1995. This tends to indicate that I am about the same
strength as I was then which is no surprise as I have played almost
none at all in the intervening 16 years.
The real issue is that they allowed a Chinese person to win the World
Championship for non-Chinese. The $4500 first prize was won by a
player who was born in China, lives in Hong Kong, speaks Cantonese,
has a Chinese mother but a Dutch father so he is considered non-
Chinese. He also won the World Championship for non-Chinese in 2009.
He has won several other "non-Chinese" prizes as well. Allowing such a
person to continue to win these "non-Chinese" championships will
discourage those of us who really are not Chinese from competing.
Right. Obviously they should introduce an obligatory DNA test for all
entrants to determine whether phenotype coincides with genotype.
Sloan, you are a dung beetle.
Post by samsloan
Sam Sloan
samsloan
2011-11-26 12:37:37 UTC
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It is a valid question as to where they should draw the line. They
have already excluded Vietnamese from winning these prizes for non-
Chinese, even though these Vietnamese insists that they are not
Chinese.

In this case the person really is Chinese even though his father is
Dutch. He is way too strong for us. There is no point in competing if
he is going to be allowed to play.

However, to take a counter-example, the top child prodigy in the USA
is Ray Robson, who already has the FIDE Grandmaster title. If he were
to take up Chinese chess I would fully support his right to compete
for and win the prizes for non-Chinese.

However, it so happens that his mother Chinese, from Beijing.

So, what is the difference between him and that other person whose
father is Dutch?

Among the other differences are that the other person was born in
China and lives in China now. Thus he should be excluded from the non-
Chinese competition. As far as I know, Ray Robson was born in the USA
and has lived his entire life here.

Please note that this person who won the prize for non-Chinese won a
cash prize of $4500 which is a fairly considerable amount of money in
China plus he won the title of "World Champion of Chinese Chess for
non-Chinese" again. Is that fair? The other top finishers in the
competition for non-Chinese were from Russia, Finland and Germany.
They really were not Chinese.

Sam Sloan
Jürgen R.
2011-11-26 12:55:25 UTC
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Post by samsloan
It is a valid question as to where they should draw the line. They
have already excluded Vietnamese from winning these prizes for non-
Chinese, even though these Vietnamese insists that they are not
Chinese.
In this case the person really is Chinese even though his father is
Dutch. He is way too strong for us. There is no point in competing if
he is going to be allowed to play.
However, to take a counter-example, the top child prodigy in the USA
is Ray Robson, who already has the FIDE Grandmaster title. If he were
to take up Chinese chess I would fully support his right to compete
for and win the prizes for non-Chinese.
However, it so happens that his mother Chinese, from Beijing.
So, what is the difference between him and that other person whose
father is Dutch?
Among the other differences are that the other person was born in
China and lives in China now. Thus he should be excluded from the non-
Chinese competition. As far as I know, Ray Robson was born in the USA
and has lived his entire life here.
Please note that this person who won the prize for non-Chinese won a
cash prize of $4500 which is a fairly considerable amount of money in
China plus he won the title of "World Champion of Chinese Chess for
non-Chinese" again. Is that fair? The other top finishers in the
competition for non-Chinese were from Russia, Finland and Germany.
They really were not Chinese.
Sloan, you are not only a dung beetle, you are also a muddlehead,
you are a fool, i.e. a person lacking sense, judgment and discretion.
Post by samsloan
Sam Sloan
None
2011-11-27 04:35:02 UTC
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Post by Jürgen R.
Post by samsloan
Please note that this person who won the prize for non-Chinese won a
cash prize of $4500 which is a fairly considerable amount of money in
China plus he won the title of "World Champion of Chinese Chess for
non-Chinese" again. Is that fair? The other top finishers in the
competition for non-Chinese were from Russia, Finland and Germany.
They really were not Chinese.
Sloan, you are not only a dung beetle, you are also a muddlehead,
you are a fool, i.e. a person lacking sense, judgment and discretion.
Truth is Sam can trace his ancestory back to Genghis Khan, Ramesses
II, and Lot's wife. Since he is a Mongolian he is Chinese and shouldst
not be permitted to play in this contest.

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